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January 10, 2016

Feast of the Baptism of the Lord

Luke 3:15-16, 21-22

As the people were filled with expectation, and all were questioning in their hearts concerning John, whether he might be the Messiah, John answered all of them by saying, “I baptize you with water; but one who is more powerful than I is coming; I am not worthy to untie the thong of his sandals. He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and fire.

Now when all the people were baptized, and when Jesus also had been baptized and was praying, the heaven was opened, and the Holy Spirit descended upon him in bodily form like a dove. And a voice came from heaven, “You are my Son, the Beloved; with you I am well pleased.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation

Beloved by God

Catholic baptism today is most often a small ceremony featuring a very young child and loving parents and family. Still, it’s a moving moment, and I believe a child really hears/feels/senses its message: “you are our beloved child – we’re delighted in you!” Jesus heard that loud and clear; it must have given him huge consolation: he was, after all, as human as we are.

But Peter’s words add another note to today’s feast: “catholicity.” Its Greek root means ‘universality.’  “I see,” Peter says, “that God shows no partiality. Rather…whoever fears him and acts uprightly is acceptable to him.”

In a world as polarized as ours (often by religion!), we need to hear and grasp that message. Jesus exemplified it all his life: he accepted everyone and his acceptance changed lives: the Samaritan woman (with five ‘husbands’), Matthew and Zaccheus (hated Roman tax-extractors), Peter (despite his traitorous denial). Only Judas refused his mercy.  

—Fr. Jack O’Callaghan, S.J. assists the Dean at Loyola University’s Stritch School of Medicine with programs in Ignatian Spirituality..

Prayer

Loving God, help us to trust we are loved by you, and thus empower us to accept your other sons and daughters, whomever they may be.  Amen.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

“The goal of the spiritual life, as Ignatius conceived it, is to ‘choose what better leads to God’s deepening life in me.” This is a dynamic goal…Most of the time this means that we are to join with God in active work in the world. This active life rests on a foundation of reflection.” (Excerpt from What is Ignatian Spirituality? By David L. Fleming, S.J.)

 

At Saint Ignatius High School, there is much emphasis put on the active work accomplished by students through academics, athletics, service, arts and extracurricular clubs. Each day, the Ignatius community pauses at 1:20 p.m. for five minutes to reflect on that active work- to pray the examen prayer. The prayer is read by students, faculty or staff. Ignatius encouraged the Jesuits to make the examen a daily habit. We invite you to share in this practice by listening to the live broadcast and/or archives of the examen prayers of the school year. Click here to listen to the live daily examen (weekday) 1:20 p.m. EST broadcast and archived recordings of the Daily Examen.

 

The examen that Ignatius outlined in the Spiritual Exercises has five points: 1) be grateful for God’s blessings; 2) ask the help of the Spirit; 3) review the day, looking for times when God has been present and times when you have left him out; 4) express sorrow for sin and ask for God’s forgiving love; 5) pray for the grace to be more totally available to God who loves you so totally.

Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Feast of the Baptism of the Lord

Luke 3:15-16, 21-22

As the people were filled with expectation, and all were questioning in their hearts concerning John, whether he might be the Messiah, John answered all of them by saying, “I baptize you with water; but one who is more powerful than I is coming; I am not worthy to untie the thong of his sandals. He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and fire.

Now when all the people were baptized, and when Jesus also had been baptized and was praying, the heaven was opened, and the Holy Spirit descended upon him in bodily form like a dove. And a voice came from heaven, “You are my Son, the Beloved; with you I am well pleased.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Loving God, help us to trust we are loved by you, and thus empower us to accept your other sons and daughters, whomever they may be.  Amen.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Beloved by God

Catholic baptism today is most often a small ceremony featuring a very young child and loving parents and family. Still, it’s a moving moment, and I believe a child really hears/feels/senses its message: “you are our beloved child – we’re delighted in you!” Jesus heard that loud and clear; it must have given him huge consolation: he was, after all, as human as we are.

But Peter’s words add another note to today’s feast: “catholicity.” Its Greek root means ‘universality.’  “I see,” Peter says, “that God shows no partiality. Rather…whoever fears him and acts uprightly is acceptable to him.”

In a world as polarized as ours (often by religion!), we need to hear and grasp that message. Jesus exemplified it all his life: he accepted everyone and his acceptance changed lives: the Samaritan woman (with five ‘husbands’), Matthew and Zaccheus (hated Roman tax-extractors), Peter (despite his traitorous denial). Only Judas refused his mercy.  

—Fr. Jack O’Callaghan, S.J. assists the Dean at Loyola University’s Stritch School of Medicine with programs in Ignatian Spirituality.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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January 10, 2016

Feast of the Baptism of the Lord

Luke 3:15-16, 21-22

As the people were filled with expectation, and all were questioning in their hearts concerning John, whether he might be the Messiah, John answered all of them by saying, “I baptize you with water; but one who is more powerful than I is coming; I am not worthy to untie the thong of his sandals. He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and fire.

Now when all the people were baptized, and when Jesus also had been baptized and was praying, the heaven was opened, and the Holy Spirit descended upon him in bodily form like a dove. And a voice came from heaven, “You are my Son, the Beloved; with you I am well pleased.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation

Beloved by God

Catholic baptism today is most often a small ceremony featuring a very young child and loving parents and family. Still, it’s a moving moment, and I believe a child really hears/feels/senses its message: “you are our beloved child – we’re delighted in you!” Jesus heard that loud and clear; it must have given him huge consolation: he was, after all, as human as we are.

But Peter’s words add another note to today’s feast: “catholicity.” Its Greek root means ‘universality.’  “I see,” Peter says, “that God shows no partiality. Rather…whoever fears him and acts uprightly is acceptable to him.”

In a world as polarized as ours (often by religion!), we need to hear and grasp that message. Jesus exemplified it all his life: he accepted everyone and his acceptance changed lives: the Samaritan woman (with five ‘husbands’), Matthew and Zaccheus (hated Roman tax-extractors), Peter (despite his traitorous denial). Only Judas refused his mercy.  

—Fr. Jack O’Callaghan, S.J. assists the Dean at Loyola University’s Stritch School of Medicine with programs in Ignatian Spirituality..

Prayer

Loving God, help us to trust we are loved by you, and thus empower us to accept your other sons and daughters, whomever they may be.  Amen.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

“The goal of the spiritual life, as Ignatius conceived it, is to ‘choose what better leads to God’s deepening life in me.” This is a dynamic goal…Most of the time this means that we are to join with God in active work in the world. This active life rests on a foundation of reflection.” (Excerpt from What is Ignatian Spirituality? By David L. Fleming, S.J.)

 

At Saint Ignatius High School, there is much emphasis put on the active work accomplished by students through academics, athletics, service, arts and extracurricular clubs. Each day, the Ignatius community pauses at 1:20 p.m. for five minutes to reflect on that active work- to pray the examen prayer. The prayer is read by students, faculty or staff. Ignatius encouraged the Jesuits to make the examen a daily habit. We invite you to share in this practice by listening to the live broadcast and/or archives of the examen prayers of the school year. Click here to listen to the live daily examen (weekday) 1:20 p.m. EST broadcast and archived recordings of the Daily Examen.

 

The examen that Ignatius outlined in the Spiritual Exercises has five points: 1) be grateful for God’s blessings; 2) ask the help of the Spirit; 3) review the day, looking for times when God has been present and times when you have left him out; 4) express sorrow for sin and ask for God’s forgiving love; 5) pray for the grace to be more totally available to God who loves you so totally.

Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Feast of the Baptism of the Lord

Luke 3:15-16, 21-22

As the people were filled with expectation, and all were questioning in their hearts concerning John, whether he might be the Messiah, John answered all of them by saying, “I baptize you with water; but one who is more powerful than I is coming; I am not worthy to untie the thong of his sandals. He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and fire.

Now when all the people were baptized, and when Jesus also had been baptized and was praying, the heaven was opened, and the Holy Spirit descended upon him in bodily form like a dove. And a voice came from heaven, “You are my Son, the Beloved; with you I am well pleased.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Loving God, help us to trust we are loved by you, and thus empower us to accept your other sons and daughters, whomever they may be.  Amen.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Beloved by God

Catholic baptism today is most often a small ceremony featuring a very young child and loving parents and family. Still, it’s a moving moment, and I believe a child really hears/feels/senses its message: “you are our beloved child – we’re delighted in you!” Jesus heard that loud and clear; it must have given him huge consolation: he was, after all, as human as we are.

But Peter’s words add another note to today’s feast: “catholicity.” Its Greek root means ‘universality.’  “I see,” Peter says, “that God shows no partiality. Rather…whoever fears him and acts uprightly is acceptable to him.”

In a world as polarized as ours (often by religion!), we need to hear and grasp that message. Jesus exemplified it all his life: he accepted everyone and his acceptance changed lives: the Samaritan woman (with five ‘husbands’), Matthew and Zaccheus (hated Roman tax-extractors), Peter (despite his traitorous denial). Only Judas refused his mercy.  

—Fr. Jack O’Callaghan, S.J. assists the Dean at Loyola University’s Stritch School of Medicine with programs in Ignatian Spirituality.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!