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February 3, 2017

St. Blase

Heb 13:1 – 8

Let mutual love continue.

Do not neglect to show hospitality to strangers,
for by doing that some have entertained angels without knowing it.
Remember those who are in prison,
as though you were in prison with them;
those who are being tortured,
as though you yourselves were being tortured.
Let marriage be held in honor by all,
and let the marriage bed be kept undefiled;
for God will judge fornicators and adulterers.
Keep your lives free from the love of money,
and be content with what you have;
for he has said,
“I will never leave you or forsake you.”
So we can say with confidence,

“The Lord is my helper;
I will not be afraid.
What can anyone do to me?”

Remember your leaders,
those who spoke the word of God to you;
consider the outcome of their way of life,
and imitate their faith.

Jesus Christ is the same yesterday and today and forever.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

So Obvious, Yet So Powerful

I’ll never forget the shortest homily I’ve ever heard.

“Do good.  Avoid evil.  Love one another.”

That was it.  So simple.  So obvious.  And yet so powerful.

I do not remember the New Testament reading from that Mass, but I wouldn’t be surprised if it was Hebrews 13, whose author simply urges us to love one another, do the right thing, and always trust in God.  It is a message we desperately need to hear today.

As members of a constantly plugged-in society, we can explore the world’s big issues like never before.  We have unprecedented access to information that allows us to assess political policy and critique the practices of corporations and institutions.  And that is good, to a certain extent.  But it’s also dangerous in that it tempts us to relegate good and evil to the realm of government and society, and to ignore the good and evil in our own actions.

So, as we reflect on today’s first reading, let’s pray for the courage to peer into our own little worlds and ask these questions:

When have I done good?

When have I done evil?

When have I loved the people around me?

Finally, let’s ask God to give us the grace to love one another, to do the right thing, and to always trust in Him.

-Mr. Jon Ott teaches theology at St. Louis U. High. 

Prayer

In everyday life, then, we must hold ourselves in balance before all of created gifts insofar as we have a choice and are not bound by some obligation. We should not fix our desires on health or sickness, wealth or poverty, success or failure, a long life or a short one. For everything has the potential of calling forth in us a deeper response to our life in God.

Our only desire and our one choice should be this: I want and I choose what better leads to God’s deepening his life in me.

―”The First Principle and Foundation” (David Fleming S.J. translation) from the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius Loyola.

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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February 3, 2017

St. Blase

Heb 13:1 – 8

Let mutual love continue.

Do not neglect to show hospitality to strangers,
for by doing that some have entertained angels without knowing it.
Remember those who are in prison,
as though you were in prison with them;
those who are being tortured,
as though you yourselves were being tortured.
Let marriage be held in honor by all,
and let the marriage bed be kept undefiled;
for God will judge fornicators and adulterers.
Keep your lives free from the love of money,
and be content with what you have;
for he has said,
“I will never leave you or forsake you.”
So we can say with confidence,

“The Lord is my helper;
I will not be afraid.
What can anyone do to me?”

Remember your leaders,
those who spoke the word of God to you;
consider the outcome of their way of life,
and imitate their faith.

Jesus Christ is the same yesterday and today and forever.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

So Obvious, Yet So Powerful

I’ll never forget the shortest homily I’ve ever heard.

“Do good.  Avoid evil.  Love one another.”

That was it.  So simple.  So obvious.  And yet so powerful.

I do not remember the New Testament reading from that Mass, but I wouldn’t be surprised if it was Hebrews 13, whose author simply urges us to love one another, do the right thing, and always trust in God.  It is a message we desperately need to hear today.

As members of a constantly plugged-in society, we can explore the world’s big issues like never before.  We have unprecedented access to information that allows us to assess political policy and critique the practices of corporations and institutions.  And that is good, to a certain extent.  But it’s also dangerous in that it tempts us to relegate good and evil to the realm of government and society, and to ignore the good and evil in our own actions.

So, as we reflect on today’s first reading, let’s pray for the courage to peer into our own little worlds and ask these questions:

When have I done good?

When have I done evil?

When have I loved the people around me?

Finally, let’s ask God to give us the grace to love one another, to do the right thing, and to always trust in Him.

-Mr. Jon Ott teaches theology at St. Louis U. High. 

Prayer

In everyday life, then, we must hold ourselves in balance before all of created gifts insofar as we have a choice and are not bound by some obligation. We should not fix our desires on health or sickness, wealth or poverty, success or failure, a long life or a short one. For everything has the potential of calling forth in us a deeper response to our life in God.

Our only desire and our one choice should be this: I want and I choose what better leads to God’s deepening his life in me.

―”The First Principle and Foundation” (David Fleming S.J. translation) from the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius Loyola.

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!