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March 22, 2017

Mt 5: 17-19

“Do not think that I have come to abolish the law or the prophets; I have come not to abolish but to fulfill. For truly I tell you, until heaven and earth pass away, not one letter, not one stroke of a letter, will pass from the law until all is accomplished.

Therefore, whoever breaks one of the least of these commandments, and teaches others to do the same, will be called least in the kingdom of heaven; but whoever does them and teaches them will be called great in the kingdom of heaven.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Spirit of Divine Law

A law, a physical and natural and divine law, exists. It’s an old Law, as old as time itself, one that was issued by the Lord God. And it’s a law that’s still relevant today. For Jesus says, “I have come not to abolish but fulfill.”

How often in everyday life do we belittle this divine Law? In everyday conversation, in politics, in classroom discussion, all over the place, we hear of situations where people seemingly “do away” with old Biblical Law, saying stuff like “well Jesus is loving and forgiving. Jesus would’ve been okay with this. The Old Testament is outdated.”

But, quite possibly, Jesus would not have been okay with “this,” whatever the “this” may be. Quite possibly, Jesus set restrictions on us that we still are morally obligated to follow (assuming we want to make it to the Kingdom of Heaven). For no law offered in the Old Testament is taken away completely by the New Testament. No, we don’t have to take every law literally. We don’t have to sell “two measures of barley for one shekel,” or something like that. But we do have to follow the spirit of the laws, even if they don’t necessarily comply with the rules of society as we have made them today. Jesus said so.

So, during Lent, let us all strive to live by the spirit of these divine Laws. If we disagree with them, let’s work during Lent to try to understand them. For, whoever does so, “will be called greatest in the Kingdom of Heaven.”

– John Burke ‘18 & Riley McEnery ‘18 are members of the Junior Pastoral Team at St. Louis U. High.

Prayer

“Love is shown more in deeds than in words!”

—St. Ignatius Loyola

 

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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March 22, 2017

Mt 5: 17-19

“Do not think that I have come to abolish the law or the prophets; I have come not to abolish but to fulfill. For truly I tell you, until heaven and earth pass away, not one letter, not one stroke of a letter, will pass from the law until all is accomplished.

Therefore, whoever breaks one of the least of these commandments, and teaches others to do the same, will be called least in the kingdom of heaven; but whoever does them and teaches them will be called great in the kingdom of heaven.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Spirit of Divine Law

A law, a physical and natural and divine law, exists. It’s an old Law, as old as time itself, one that was issued by the Lord God. And it’s a law that’s still relevant today. For Jesus says, “I have come not to abolish but fulfill.”

How often in everyday life do we belittle this divine Law? In everyday conversation, in politics, in classroom discussion, all over the place, we hear of situations where people seemingly “do away” with old Biblical Law, saying stuff like “well Jesus is loving and forgiving. Jesus would’ve been okay with this. The Old Testament is outdated.”

But, quite possibly, Jesus would not have been okay with “this,” whatever the “this” may be. Quite possibly, Jesus set restrictions on us that we still are morally obligated to follow (assuming we want to make it to the Kingdom of Heaven). For no law offered in the Old Testament is taken away completely by the New Testament. No, we don’t have to take every law literally. We don’t have to sell “two measures of barley for one shekel,” or something like that. But we do have to follow the spirit of the laws, even if they don’t necessarily comply with the rules of society as we have made them today. Jesus said so.

So, during Lent, let us all strive to live by the spirit of these divine Laws. If we disagree with them, let’s work during Lent to try to understand them. For, whoever does so, “will be called greatest in the Kingdom of Heaven.”

– John Burke ‘18 & Riley McEnery ‘18 are members of the Junior Pastoral Team at St. Louis U. High.

Prayer

“Love is shown more in deeds than in words!”

—St. Ignatius Loyola

 

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!