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March 28, 2017

Jn 5: 1-16

After this there was a festival of the Jews, and Jesus went up to Jerusalem. Now in Jerusalem by the Sheep Gate there is a pool, called in Hebrew Beth-zatha, which has five porticoes. In these lay many invalids—blind, lame, and paralyzed. One man was there who had been ill for thirty-eight years. When Jesus saw him lying there and knew that he had been there a long time, he said to him, “Do you want to be made well?” The sick man answered him, “Sir, I have no one to put me into the pool when the water is stirred up; and while I am making my way, someone else steps down ahead of me.”

Jesus said to him, “Stand up, take your mat and walk.” At once the man was made well, and he took up his mat and began to walk. Now that day was a sabbath. So the Jews said to the man who had been cured, “It is the sabbath; it is not lawful for you to carry your mat.” But he answered them, “The man who made me well said to me, ‘Take up your mat and walk.’” They asked him, “Who is the man who said to you, ‘Take it up and walk’?” Now the man who had been healed did not know who it was, for Jesus had disappeared in the crowd that was there.

Later Jesus found him in the temple and said to him, “See, you have been made well! Do not sin any more, so that nothing worse happens to you.” The man went away and told the Jews that it was Jesus who had made him well. Therefore the Jews started persecuting Jesus, because he was doing such things on the sabbath.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Images of Healing

Today, Jesus gives us a message of healing and a call to serve others. The crippled man lay in the street, passed by crowds of righteous men heading to a great feast, while he had been lying ill for thirty-eight years. Jesus, unlike the holy men, stops to help the man. He shows us that the true measure of a person’s acceptance of his goodness is our acts of service to others. Jesus knew the risk that came with helping the crippled man, but he did so anyway. We often give ourselves excuses for not doing service to those in need, such as not having enough time. Ask yourself what is keeping you from doing good for another and this lenten season, try to overcome these obstacles, and seek to act in service to the people around us.

Jesus also offers us an image of healing in this passage. The man had been lying there begging for help for thirty-eight years, but Jesus still stopped to help him. Sometimes we can feel like the man, helpless and giving up. Although we may feel like nobody can help us, Jesus is always waiting to forgive us. The Sacrament of Reconciliation is vital during this Lenten season to bring us back to God, and we challenge you to take advantage of this saving grace and walk again with Jesus.
Ben Blittschau and Zach Szatkowski are members of the Sophomore Pastoral Team at St. Louis U. High.

Prayer

Wade in the water
Wade in the water, children,
Wade in the water
God’s a-going to trouble the water

See that host all dressed in white
God’s a-going to trouble the water
The leader looks like the Israelite
God’s a-going to trouble the water

See that band all dressed in red
God’s a-going to trouble the water
Looks like the band that Moses led
God’s a-going to trouble the water

Look over yonder, what do you see?
God’s a-going to trouble the water
The Holy Ghost a-coming on me
God’s a-going to trouble the water

—traditional African-American spiritual

 

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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March 28, 2017

Jn 5: 1-16

After this there was a festival of the Jews, and Jesus went up to Jerusalem. Now in Jerusalem by the Sheep Gate there is a pool, called in Hebrew Beth-zatha, which has five porticoes. In these lay many invalids—blind, lame, and paralyzed. One man was there who had been ill for thirty-eight years. When Jesus saw him lying there and knew that he had been there a long time, he said to him, “Do you want to be made well?” The sick man answered him, “Sir, I have no one to put me into the pool when the water is stirred up; and while I am making my way, someone else steps down ahead of me.”

Jesus said to him, “Stand up, take your mat and walk.” At once the man was made well, and he took up his mat and began to walk. Now that day was a sabbath. So the Jews said to the man who had been cured, “It is the sabbath; it is not lawful for you to carry your mat.” But he answered them, “The man who made me well said to me, ‘Take up your mat and walk.’” They asked him, “Who is the man who said to you, ‘Take it up and walk’?” Now the man who had been healed did not know who it was, for Jesus had disappeared in the crowd that was there.

Later Jesus found him in the temple and said to him, “See, you have been made well! Do not sin any more, so that nothing worse happens to you.” The man went away and told the Jews that it was Jesus who had made him well. Therefore the Jews started persecuting Jesus, because he was doing such things on the sabbath.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Images of Healing

Today, Jesus gives us a message of healing and a call to serve others. The crippled man lay in the street, passed by crowds of righteous men heading to a great feast, while he had been lying ill for thirty-eight years. Jesus, unlike the holy men, stops to help the man. He shows us that the true measure of a person’s acceptance of his goodness is our acts of service to others. Jesus knew the risk that came with helping the crippled man, but he did so anyway. We often give ourselves excuses for not doing service to those in need, such as not having enough time. Ask yourself what is keeping you from doing good for another and this lenten season, try to overcome these obstacles, and seek to act in service to the people around us.

Jesus also offers us an image of healing in this passage. The man had been lying there begging for help for thirty-eight years, but Jesus still stopped to help him. Sometimes we can feel like the man, helpless and giving up. Although we may feel like nobody can help us, Jesus is always waiting to forgive us. The Sacrament of Reconciliation is vital during this Lenten season to bring us back to God, and we challenge you to take advantage of this saving grace and walk again with Jesus.
Ben Blittschau and Zach Szatkowski are members of the Sophomore Pastoral Team at St. Louis U. High.

Prayer

Wade in the water
Wade in the water, children,
Wade in the water
God’s a-going to trouble the water

See that host all dressed in white
God’s a-going to trouble the water
The leader looks like the Israelite
God’s a-going to trouble the water

See that band all dressed in red
God’s a-going to trouble the water
Looks like the band that Moses led
God’s a-going to trouble the water

Look over yonder, what do you see?
God’s a-going to trouble the water
The Holy Ghost a-coming on me
God’s a-going to trouble the water

—traditional African-American spiritual

 

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!