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April 9, 2017

Phil 2:6-11

Christ Jesus,
who, though he was in the form of God,
did not regard equality with God
as something to be exploited,
but emptied himself,
taking the form of a slave,
being born in human likeness.
And being found in human form,
he humbled himself

and became obedient to the point of death—
even death on a cross.

Therefore God also highly exalted him
and gave him the name
that is above every name,
so that at the name of Jesus
every knee should bend,
in heaven and on earth and under the earth,
and every tongue should confess
that Jesus Christ is Lord,
to the glory of God the Father.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Confessing Jesus as Lord

When was the last time you knelt down upon hearing the name of Jesus? To put it another way: do you confess Jesus as Lord with your life?

Perhaps such direct questions make us uncomfortable or uneasy. Ultimately, however, I think these questions should give us pause, because they are about what is fundamental. They are not to be taken lightly. These questions are really asking: to whom (or what) do you belong? To whom (or what) are you truly beholden? Ultimately, whatever or whomever we name affects how we live and interact with others, self and God.

Today is Palm Sunday, when we ought to consider our response to these questions as we make our way into Jerusalem with Jesus. The hymn from Philippians resets our focus on who Jesus is and what it means to follow him: Jesus, though in the form of God, does not live for himself or for self-satisfaction, but empties himself in love to the point of death on a cross. If Jesus is Lord of our lives, then we too are called to forgo living for ourselves and instead live for others and God’s greater glory.

So…. Do I dare confess Jesus as Lord of my life? Can I follow him along that self-giving path?

-Mr. Dan Finucane, ‘06 teaches theology and is a campus minister at St. Louis U. High.

Prayer

Were you there when they crucified my Lord?
Were you there when they crucified my Lord?
Oh, sometime it causes me to tremble, tremble, tremble.
Were you there when they crucified my Lord?

—African-American spiritual

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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April 9, 2017

Phil 2:6-11

Christ Jesus,
who, though he was in the form of God,
did not regard equality with God
as something to be exploited,
but emptied himself,
taking the form of a slave,
being born in human likeness.
And being found in human form,
he humbled himself

and became obedient to the point of death—
even death on a cross.

Therefore God also highly exalted him
and gave him the name
that is above every name,
so that at the name of Jesus
every knee should bend,
in heaven and on earth and under the earth,
and every tongue should confess
that Jesus Christ is Lord,
to the glory of God the Father.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Confessing Jesus as Lord

When was the last time you knelt down upon hearing the name of Jesus? To put it another way: do you confess Jesus as Lord with your life?

Perhaps such direct questions make us uncomfortable or uneasy. Ultimately, however, I think these questions should give us pause, because they are about what is fundamental. They are not to be taken lightly. These questions are really asking: to whom (or what) do you belong? To whom (or what) are you truly beholden? Ultimately, whatever or whomever we name affects how we live and interact with others, self and God.

Today is Palm Sunday, when we ought to consider our response to these questions as we make our way into Jerusalem with Jesus. The hymn from Philippians resets our focus on who Jesus is and what it means to follow him: Jesus, though in the form of God, does not live for himself or for self-satisfaction, but empties himself in love to the point of death on a cross. If Jesus is Lord of our lives, then we too are called to forgo living for ourselves and instead live for others and God’s greater glory.

So…. Do I dare confess Jesus as Lord of my life? Can I follow him along that self-giving path?

-Mr. Dan Finucane, ‘06 teaches theology and is a campus minister at St. Louis U. High.

Prayer

Were you there when they crucified my Lord?
Were you there when they crucified my Lord?
Oh, sometime it causes me to tremble, tremble, tremble.
Were you there when they crucified my Lord?

—African-American spiritual

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!